Paint Chip Turkeys

For the past two weeks, I’ve made paint chip turkeys with a good majority of my groups.  I found the original idea here, but didn’t want to work on “I’m thankful for…” with my groups.  Instead, we targeted artic, Wh- questions, pronouns, comparing/contrasting, yes/no questions, absurdities, regular past tense verbs, social skills, and sequencing.  Yes, all of that, sometimes 3-4 things in one session, all with one cute (almost free) craft!

My co-SLP and I raided the paint sections at both Home Depot and Lowe’s.  We grabbed a ton of different shapes, sizes, and colors.  Here’s our loot before we started.

 
I cut the wide paint chips into 3 long strip, to make them look more like “feathers”.  (The funny shaped ones, that actually look like a feather, came from Home Depot, by the way!)
 
 
To target a variety of speech/language goals, I went through my Super Duper “Fun Deck” books.  I have all four at my school, so it was easy to go through them and find a target for each student.  For the artic kids, I used my Jumbo Webber Artic Drill book.  To make the papers fit onto the feathers, I put the page(s) I wanted on the copy machine and shrunk them to 50%.  They may be difficult for you to see, but I promise it won’t be an issue for your students (with the exception of any vision problems, obviously).
 
 
I cut out the pertinent information into little boxes for each student.  The student above is working on answering wh- questions given 3 choices.  Some students were shown a picture and asked to label the verb, insert the correct pronoun, compare and contrast the pictures, etc.  The Fun Deck worksheet books covered EVERYTHING that I needed!
 
verbs and when questions

more when questions

absurdities and answering yes/no questions
It was a great way to work on following directions, too.  Once our feathers were complete, I had the students put some glue on the bottoms of their paint chips and put it on the back of a brown circle I had cut.  This was difficulty for some, so I drew an “X” on the bottom and had the student “put the glue on the X.”  For the turkey’s face, I had students use Sharpie markers to draw an upside-down yellow triangle for the beak and an upside-down red heart for the waddle.  I used googley-eyes, too.  Then we did stick-figure legs on the bottom.  Some students chose to get creative and draw wings on their turkeys, too.  We had the students describe their turkeys’ faces using adjective+noun phrases (i.e. yellow triangle & red heart).  It also worked on features of animals: beak, waddle, eyes, legs, feathers.
 
 

compare/contrast

Verbs

social skills

final /b/

past tense verbs

subject pronouns

Why questions

Wh- questions

Wh- questions

Wh- questions

pronouns & absurdities
I couldn’t pick just one…  The last two pictures are of students following the direction, “put your turkey on your head”.  Just some silly fun 🙂
 
We also worked on conditional directions when we were finished:  “If your turkey has a red feather, go line up at the door.”
 
 
 
Go ahead and bombard your nearest home improvement store.  And save any extras you have for spring time!  😉

Pumpkin craft for ANY goal.

 
Today with my kindergarteners I targeted their goals in a brand new way for them. We didn’t play a game, we made pumpkins!  I found the original idea here.
 
To start, I cut orange construction paper in long strips.  My stips are about 12 inches long and an inch and a half wide.  I gave each student ten strips.
 
Using BoardMaker, I printed 1 inch pictures.  My visuals targeted their goals, which had to do with sequencing and wh- questions.  I had questions on some and answers on the others.  I asked the students the questions on the papers; when they answered I gave them the corresponding visuals.  Then they glued them on the orange strips.  I also had steps of common sequences printed out.  I had them separated into groups and gave them to the student.  He put them in order while the other students were answering questions, then he told me “the story” on his turn.  He also glued them to the strip in order.  They really loved it!
 
My hesitation with crafts has always been that the focus would be too much on crafting and not enough on speech/language goals.  Not with this one!
 

When they were all finished gluing their pictures on, I had them stack the strips together again.  I punched holes in each end of each strip.  Then, the students each helped me put a brad “through” the hole.  (We did a LOT of modeling of this word because I know from past sessions that they don’t know it.)
 

When we were finished with the first brad, I had the student flip their strips over so that the pictures were facing the table.  We fanned out the strips and I had the students curl up a strip and hand it to me (so I could keep the holes somewhat in line) one at a time.  I placed another brad in this set of holes and there we had it!  Look how cute they turned out!

wh- question pumpkin

sequencing pumpkin

This was my first attempt at it, so I didn’t add leaves.  I plan to do this same thing with my preschoolers and their artic sounds.  For them I might do a leaf or vine of some sort!

One of the pumpkins (the one I forgot to get a picture of…) came out much more round than the other two.  I have no idea for the life of me why that is, though!  I wish I could figure it out!  I really wish I had gotten a picture, because it really was drastically better.  Oh well!

This was so easy and fun!  I’m definitely going to be doing more crafts with my younger guys!