No-Print Product Review

This week I had the pleasure of trying out my first “no print” activity.  On the surface, this type of product looks just like any other, however, it works just like an app!

Jess from Figuratively Speeching was kind enough to give me a copy of her Associations: An Interactive No Print Activity.  Associations

There’s a variety of ways that you can use the activity; I chose to use it on my Smart Board.  Don’t worry – if you don’t have a Smart Board you can use it on your iPad, laptop, or even your iPhone!

(For something like this, it’s handy to have it saved on your iPad or computer.   If you’re wondering how to save such a thing on your iPad, Dropbox is a great app for such a thing!  Go download it!)

I chose to use this activity with a group of moderate to severe language disordered students who all happen to have autism.  All are at a different level, both receptively and expressively, but this was easy to adapt to each student’s ability and goals.

When you first open the file (a PDF), the cover page will pop up.  I used this opportunity to give one student a direction: Touch the white flower next to the cat.”  (And he did it correctly!)

The next page to appear is the directions page.  I had read this before I started, so again I had the student click “next” to get to the first question.

Fullscreen capture 1292014 101859 PM.bmp

My first student needed tons of help to answer this question.  (He didn’t even know what bacon was!  Poor kid is missing out!)  After I prompted his threw it, I was also able to follow up the question with, “When do we eat bacon and eggs?”  Again, he needed a lot of help to avoid echolalia and answer this when question.

For the next aspect of the activity, I moved on to a different student whose language skills are a little higher.  I clicked the “MC” that you see on the right side of the screen.  He had a multiple choice choice for how bason and eggs go together.  After reading his choices, he was able to answer it correctly!  If you simply click the correct go together, you are taken to the main page which has links to all of the questions in the activity on it.

Fullscreen capture 1292014 101440 PM.bmp

I used this opportunity to ask him how they go together again.  Without having the written visual in front of him, it was a little more difficult and he needed prompting.

For another student in this group, associations are too high level.  Instead of having him select the go together, I asked him a question about object functions.  The associations question asked what went with “cookie”; I asked, “Which one do you drink?”  In the field of 3 given, “milk” was the correct answer so I just covered the question and let him choose according to my question.

My students, especially my ASD population, LOVE anything that has to do with interactive technology.  This activity is versatile, portable, and affordable!  I was able to target, not only associations, but wh- questions, following directions, and object functions.  Not to mention, my students worked on taking turns and sitting patiently while working their classmate go.

You can win your copy of this outstanding product below by entering the Rafflecopter.  Thanks, Jess, for giving me an extra copy to hand out to a lucky reader! (Click the Rafflecopter link to find the widget and enter!)
a Rafflecopter giveaway

Turtle Power!

My latest download is actually a series, so I figured I’d show you all that it has to offer.

The first products focus on articulation.  There are two versions: one for early sounds and one for late sounds.

Here are the sounds contained in each pack:

Early sounds
Late sounds

Here’s some examples of what the pages look like:

Initial /w/
Final /ch/

Find the early sound pack here and the late sounds pack at this address.

Next up is language.  It includes both receptive and expressive tasks.

Here’s a list of what’s included in this download:

Some examples of the receptive pages:

There are a variety of following directions tasks.

Next are some visuals for describing attributes, along with cards to help.  They can be sorted onto the pictures or used as visual cues.  There are 4 attributes per picture/noun.

 Next there are prepositions of location.  Below is the page with words, but there is also a page without words.

 Next, students must put the steps of a familiar sequence in the correct order.

The last receptive area is answering questions.  It includes all 5 Wh- questions, but below are just a few.

Next come the expressive tasks.
The first expressive area is compare & contrast.  Visuals are used!

Then comes sequences, where students must independently describe the order of events for the tasks listed.

The next areas are synonyms and antonyms.  I tried to pick words that are not the typical, simple ones you always see.

The last few pages work on categories in a variety of ways.  This is a huge area of need for my first graders, so I just had to include it!  (They’re the ones that I specifically made this pack for.  Last week one said, “This game is so fun.  Thank you for making it for us!”  So sweet!)

Students must list items in the given category.

Students must decide which item in the list does not belong.  My students are pros at this when visuals are involved, but have much more difficulty when just words are used.

The category names required are both concrete and abstract, simple and more advanced.
The last packet is grammar.  It targets a bunch of areas for preschoolers through early elementary.

A detailed description of what’s included
a few subject pronouns

some object pronouns

a couple of the possessive pronoun sentences

Some of my preschoolers need I vs me help!

One of the sorting mats.  Cut them along the horizontal lines.  There is also a set of mats that includes visuals for each word!

The regular past tense sentences, with visuals.  The present tense of the verb is discretely written in a script font on the sewer lids, in case you need a little help prompting 🙂

Sooooooooo many of my kids need third person singular -s help!

Have students formulate a sentence with present progressive verbs using the picture given.

Sorting mats for the is/are, have/has, do/does cards.  Cut along the vertical lines!

A, The, or An: a sorting mat/anchor chart is included for these, as well!

Put the words in order to formulate a grammatically correct question – a real struggle for many!
Now, if you really want a deal, I’ve bundled all of these products together! So, you get 4 products for the price of 3!  It’s a 25% savings!  Find the bundle here.
Here’s you chance to win your choice of one of the above downloads (not the bundle).  Enter using the Rafflecopter below!

a Rafflecopter giveaway

I hope your kids love these turtles (and packets) as much as mine do!

Paint Chip Turkeys

For the past two weeks, I’ve made paint chip turkeys with a good majority of my groups.  I found the original idea here, but didn’t want to work on “I’m thankful for…” with my groups.  Instead, we targeted artic, Wh- questions, pronouns, comparing/contrasting, yes/no questions, absurdities, regular past tense verbs, social skills, and sequencing.  Yes, all of that, sometimes 3-4 things in one session, all with one cute (almost free) craft!

My co-SLP and I raided the paint sections at both Home Depot and Lowe’s.  We grabbed a ton of different shapes, sizes, and colors.  Here’s our loot before we started.

 
I cut the wide paint chips into 3 long strip, to make them look more like “feathers”.  (The funny shaped ones, that actually look like a feather, came from Home Depot, by the way!)
 
 
To target a variety of speech/language goals, I went through my Super Duper “Fun Deck” books.  I have all four at my school, so it was easy to go through them and find a target for each student.  For the artic kids, I used my Jumbo Webber Artic Drill book.  To make the papers fit onto the feathers, I put the page(s) I wanted on the copy machine and shrunk them to 50%.  They may be difficult for you to see, but I promise it won’t be an issue for your students (with the exception of any vision problems, obviously).
 
 
I cut out the pertinent information into little boxes for each student.  The student above is working on answering wh- questions given 3 choices.  Some students were shown a picture and asked to label the verb, insert the correct pronoun, compare and contrast the pictures, etc.  The Fun Deck worksheet books covered EVERYTHING that I needed!
 
verbs and when questions

more when questions

absurdities and answering yes/no questions
It was a great way to work on following directions, too.  Once our feathers were complete, I had the students put some glue on the bottoms of their paint chips and put it on the back of a brown circle I had cut.  This was difficulty for some, so I drew an “X” on the bottom and had the student “put the glue on the X.”  For the turkey’s face, I had students use Sharpie markers to draw an upside-down yellow triangle for the beak and an upside-down red heart for the waddle.  I used googley-eyes, too.  Then we did stick-figure legs on the bottom.  Some students chose to get creative and draw wings on their turkeys, too.  We had the students describe their turkeys’ faces using adjective+noun phrases (i.e. yellow triangle & red heart).  It also worked on features of animals: beak, waddle, eyes, legs, feathers.
 
 

compare/contrast

Verbs

social skills

final /b/

past tense verbs

subject pronouns

Why questions

Wh- questions

Wh- questions

Wh- questions

pronouns & absurdities
I couldn’t pick just one…  The last two pictures are of students following the direction, “put your turkey on your head”.  Just some silly fun 🙂
 
We also worked on conditional directions when we were finished:  “If your turkey has a red feather, go line up at the door.”
 
 
 
Go ahead and bombard your nearest home improvement store.  And save any extras you have for spring time!  😉

Fall wrap-up

I can’t believe it’s been so long since my last post.  I wish I could tell you that I’ve done something exciting with my time, but it’s honestly nothing I can put my finger on.

I know Fall is almost over, but here are all of the things the OT and I did with our intellectually disabled groups over the past month.

Here we did a sensory acorn craft.  I printed an acorn template from Boardmaker in black and white. (Did you know you can use the black and white library only?  I didn’t until last year!)  We used vanilla pudding for the tops and coffee for the bottoms.  Here are all of the materials we used:

We mounted the acorn onto a brown piece of construction paper.  We painted glue on the top half first and squirted the vanilla pudding powder (out of the bear/honey container) onto it.  This smelled AMAZING!

This guy loved smelling the pudding!

 Next, we painted glue on the bottoms and put the coffee grounds on it.  FYI – I used decaf coffee.  I dare not waste my beloved caffeine on artwork!  (The art teacher overheard me say this and was slightly offended! haha)

Next we glued symbols for “top” and “bottom” to label our acorns.  We also glued symbols for “yellow” and “brown” across from the “top” and “bottom” symbols.  We also worked on writing sight words (for those who were capable) “the” and “is” to make a sentence: The top is yellow.  The bottom is brown.”

I will have you know that many of my students HATED the coffee smell.  One could not stop making the stink face at his project, and when we walked down to his classroom, I caught him hovering his paper over the trash can.  Some very much enjoyed it though.  I didn’t tell them what either smell was before having them smell it.  Watching children smell is possibly one of my favorite things to do.  It’s just too adorable and funny.  The faces at the coffee smell – man, I wish I could have gotten them all on video!

The finished project!

Next, we made hot glue spider webs.  This is mainly an adult-only “craft” – but the language is outstanding! We only did this with our higher functioning ASD and language delayed students – not the mod-severe intellectually disabled population.  (Basically only with kids who can understand the danger of a hot glue gun – and follow the command “don’t touch” seriously.)

This is a great activity for following directions!

You will need a shallow pan (a dark one or a Teflon-coated one would work well for seeing the web), cold/cool water, a glue gun, PLENTY of glue sticks, and spider rings.  We told the students that we needed cold water then had then guess where we might go to get that and how we were going to carry it.

 First, we drew circles (about 4) with glue in the water.

Next, draw 4 straight lines through the circles you’ve drawn.  This is how the whole thing will stick together, so make sure everything connects.

The last step is to take it out of the water (make sure the glue has completely solidified) and add a spider!  We cut the ring part off of the spider rings, then glued in onto the webs.  The students told us where they would like to put their spiders.  Most chose “in the middle”.

After doing the first student’s web, we had each subsequent student tell us exactly what to do.  This worked on sequencing, using specific words, giving instructions, using correct vocabulary, etc.

The kids LOVED their “prize” at the end of this session.  This one was a huge hit!

The package of spider rings that we got had orange and black spiders.  I’ve seen purple, too.  This was a great way to have students make specific requests and use adjective + noun phrases.

For the students who could not do this spider activity, we made an adapted version.  We helped the students draw circles and straight lines with glue, then sprinkled silver glitter on it.  We stapled the spider to a corner of the paper.  These came out very cute, too.  The same language concepts were targeted, just in a safer way!  (Sorry, no picture.  Yet.  I’ll take one Monday at school!)

Memorial Day craft

Today the OT and I did a Memorial Day craft with our intellectually disabled students.  We made flags!  This activity helped target colors, concepts (big & little and top, bottom, & middle), patterns, shapes (star, square, rectangle), nouns (flag, paper, glue), and verbs (squeeze, glue, touch, pick up, put on).

I used sheets of white construction paper then pre-cut strips of red paper into long and short pieces.  I also cut a blue square and used the Ellison press to cut a star.  **I would have used a bunch of little stars, but our Ellison press only had a big star.

our materials
 
 
First, we glued two “small rectangles” to the top right side.  We receptively identified which ones were “small”, which were “red” and then labeled red.
 

gluing the big rectangles

Next, we added two big rectangles to the bottom of the flag.  Lots of great language!

The next step was to add the blue square to the top left (which was blank at this point).  Everything fit perfectly together!  Last, we added one big star to the middle of the blue square.

Voila!  There we have our flags!

Hope those of you who are not yet out of school can use this activity.  Being in an area with a large military population, I know parents will appreciate this Memorial Day activity!

The wonder of the Dollar Store

Aside from Target, the dollar store is probably my favorite place to shop.  Granted, Target also has a “Dollar Spot” – I sense a theme developing.

My mom found me these at (I believe) a Dollar Tree in New York.  Today I graduated a student and couldn’t wait to deliver this certificate!  How cute is it?!  And there are a BUNCH in the pack!

Stop what you’re doing now and head to your nearest Dollar Tree, because even if your room isn’t pirate themed, these would be perfect when an /r/ kid is dismissed!

I also found these gems at the Target Dollar Spot.  They’re actually coasters!  Although, they were more than $1; they were $3.  I only bought 2 sets, but each comes with 2 halves of the bun, a hamburger patty, lettuce, tomato, and cheese.  If they had been $1, I would have bought all they had!  I haven’t done anything in particular with them yet, but I think it would be fun to make a reinforcing game out of collecting all the necessary pieces to make a cheeseburger (a la Pretty Pretty Princess, circa 1993.  Who’s with me?).  There’s also the obvious sequencing aspect of the coasters.

What would you use these for???  I’d love to hear your ideas!  Please comment below.  If I like your idea and end up using it, you will get to choose any product from my TpT store!

 
A colleague of mine found these frames at the dollar store.  They are magnetic.  In them, she puts symbols or small manipulatives (i.e. coins) so they can be used for cummunication and participation with her intellectually disabled students, who might bend/tear cards or are unable to grasp something as small as a coin.  How great are they?!

 

I got these at the dollar store just the other day.  They are coordinating sets.  I plan to use them for activities that involve matching (synonyms, irregular past vs. present verbs, go-togethers, etc.)  I laminated them and will put Velcro on them.  That way, I can switch out the targets easily!  I will also use a dry erase marker to write the targets of the students who can read.  Aren’t they adorable?!  I got one of each design they had!

 What have you found at the dollar store?!

~Denise

I have… Who has?

I’ve been so anxious to use the game “I have… Who has?” in therapy for months, but I didn’t know how to do it since I usually have no more than 4 students in a group.  I couldn’t bombard the students with 5 cards each; that just didn’t seem productive.  Besides the obvious target of the game (whatever each student “has”) it’s also great for sentence structure, have/has, question formulation, expanding utterance, and social interaction.

I developed this version of the game for my small groups.  It works on features of objects (things that have feathers, wheels, zippers, etc.).  It comes with 16 “I have” cards and includes both words and pictures.  The letters (A-D) in the bottom left corner of the cards will help in keeping the cards in order.  This is important when you are only giving each student one (or two) cards at a time and the order of the cards needs to be maintained so the game works.

I also included some supplemental cards to expand on these vocabulary skills. 

Since I played with Kindergarteners, I only gave them one card at a time.  As they “used” one, I took it and gave them another.  (This method of play can obviously be used with any “I have… Who has?” game.)

I really loved the results of playing this game, even with those as young as Kindergarten.  It took some modeling of the way to read the sentences and how to respond if your item was called, but the overall goal of the game was met. 

Check out this product here!  What other types of “I have… Who has?” would you like to see???